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With Safari 10 on macOS Sierra, Adobe Flash will be disabled by default when browsing the web

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Alongside various new features (Siri, Auto Unlock, Apple Pay) coming in macOS Sierra, Apple’s next major desktop operating system, it also ships with the brand new version of Safari, Safari 10. Safari 10 introduces a major change in the way the browser handles plugins. In short, proprietary plugins like Adobe Flash will be disabled by default when browsing the web.

This means that websites will serve modern HTML5 representations of content as often as possible as they will not be able to detect an installation of Flash at all. Safari is smart however — it will allow you to enable Flash temporarily on demand …



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Yet another “critical” Flash vulnerability allows an attacker to take control of your Mac – fix available

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Adobe has announced the latest in a long line of “critical” Flash vulnerabilities, allowing an attacker to take control of your Mac. The same vulnerability has been found in Adobe AIR. The company has released updates for both, which we recommend you install immediately.

Adobe has released security updates for Adobe Flash Player.  These updates address critical vulnerabilities that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.

Adobe is aware of a report that an exploit for CVE-2016-1010 is being used in limited, targeted attacks.

You can update from the link below …



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Adobe delivers Animate CC (formerly Flash Professional) with many new features, also updates Muse & Bridge

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Adobe announced back in December that it would be renaming Flash Professional as Animate CC in recognition of the fact that HTML 5 has now taken over from Flash as the main form of web animation. It has now done so, adding in a “seriously long list” of new features at the same time.

The new features range from new vector art brushes to a rotating stage whose contents scale proportionally to the size – and the company is providing live demos on its Twitch.tv channel …



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Google now flags Flash content in search results on iOS/Android devices, saving clicks

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If you’ve ever been frustrated by visiting a website on your iPhone or iPad and finding it won’t work because it uses Flash, you’ll welcome the latest Google initiative: it is now flagging Flash content in its search results, warning that the site may not work on your device.

Starting today, we will indicate to searchers when our algorithms detect pages that may not work on their devices. For example, Adobe Flash is not supported on iOS devices or on Android versions 4.1 and higher, and a page whose contents are mostly Flash may be noted

As Google notes, Android has now also abandoned Flash support due to the same reliability, security and performance concerns that Steve Jobs expressed in his famous open letter to Adobe back in 2010. Adobe has been forced to issue a succession of security updates to Flash, the most recent being two emergency updates earlier this year.

Google says it hopes the move, coupled to Web Fundamentals and Web Starter Kit initiatives for developers will encourage the use of HTML5 in place of Flash.

Adobe releases Adobe Flash security update in second emergency fix this month

Less than three weeks ago, Adobe released a critical security update for its Flash Player plug-in fixing an exploit that allowed machines to be accessed remotely by attackers.

Yet another security update is out today (and strongly recommended). The new build (Version 12.0.0.70) intends to address a vulnerability that allowed attackers to target at least three nonprofit websites according to security firm FireEye and reported by ArsTechnica



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Adobe releases critical security update for Flash exploit

Flash Update

Adobe released a critical security update to its Flash Player plug-in (version 12.0.0.44) on Tuesday that addresses an exploit that put machines at risk of being remotely accessed by attackers. You can grab the latest version of Flash Player here (OS X and Windows) or check for updates in the System Preferences app… or you could remove Flash altogether with Adobe’s uninstaller.

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Latest Mavericks Safari browser safer as Flash finally gets sandboxed

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Safari 7, introduced with OS X Mavericks, is now better protected against malware and poorly-written Flash code as Flash is finally sandboxed.

Sandboxing means that OS X restricts what the code can do, stopping a badly-written app from crashing the entire browser and preventing malware from getting access to any other part of your Mac. Flash has been sandboxed for some time in Chrome, Firefox and even Internet Explorer.

In an Adobe blog post, Platform Security Strategist Peleus Uhley wrote:

For the technically minded, this means that there is a specific com.macromedia.Flash Player.plugin.sb file defining the security permissions for Flash Player when it runs within the sandboxed plugin process. As you might expect, Flash Player’s capabilities to read and write files will be limited to only those locations it needs to function properly. The sandbox also limits Flash Player’s local connections to device resources and inter-process communication (IPC) channels. Finally, the sandbox limits Flash Player’s networking privileges to prevent unnecessary connection capabilities.

Safari users on OS X Mavericks can view Flash Player content while benefiting from these added security protections. We’d like to thank the Apple security team for working with us to deliver this solution.

Via CNET

Adobe releases emergency Flash security update to address malware attacks on OS X

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As noted by ArsTechnica, Adobe just released an unscheduled patch to address two vulnerabilities that could be the source of malware attacks on both OS X and Windows. Apple has also issued a KB urging users to update. According to the advisory posted by Adobe, the attacks targeted Firefox or Safari users on Mac:

Adobe is also aware of reports that CVE-2013-0634 is being exploited in the wild in attacks delivered via malicious Flash (SWF) content hosted on websites that target Flash Player in Firefox or Safari on the Macintosh platform, as well as attacks designed to trick Windows users into opening a Microsoft Word document delivered as an email attachment which contains malicious Flash (SWF) content.

The update is available through Adobe’s website here.

Edge, Adobe’s new web motion and interaction design tool, now available as a preview

Adobe today released its “Flash for HTML5” web design tool Edge into Beta.

Adobe® Edge is a new web motion and interaction design tool that allows designers to bring animated content to websites, using web standards like HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS3.

This version of Edge focuses primarily on adding rich motion design to new or existing HTML projects, that runs beautifully on devices and desktops.

  • Create new compositions with Edge’s drawing and text tools.
  • Import popular web graphics such as SVG, PNG, JPG or GIF files.
  • Easily choreograph animation with the timeline editor. Animate position, size, color, shape, rotation and more at the property level.
  • Energize existing HTML files with motion, while preserving the integrity of CSS-based HTML layouts.
  • Copy and paste transitions, invert them, and choose from over 25 built-in easing effects for added creativity.

Two example videos and feature breakdown below (Via The Loop):

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Adobe releases new Flash 11 and Air 3 to Beta Channel


Stage 3D Molehill demo

For all of you Adobe Flash and Air fans out there, Adobe has released the next major version of the authoring tool out onto the Internet.  New features of Flash include, Stage3D APIs, 64-bit support, G.711 audio compression for telephony, H.264/AVC SW Encoding, Socket Progress Events and HD surround sound.

Developers can download the betas here.

Full listing of new features in Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 below:

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Android 2.3 Gingerbread now runs on an iPhone 3G

Hackers have finally managed to get Android 2.3 Gingerbread working on a jailbroken iPhone 3G — based on the iDroid project, you should be able to keep both iOS and Android in dual-boot configuration on your iPhone. more on this and a video (Flash, so we didn’t embed it here) over at Redmond Pie.

(Sony and Dell’s Android phones are still running Android 1.6!)

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